Idaho Fly Fishers Blog

Beautiful North Idaho Home in Hope

Beautiful North Idaho Home in Hope
A real fishers dream! Gorgeous home on the Hope Peninsula surrounded by nature with incredible views, priced below appraisal, owner financing and deeded lake access.

About Me

My photo
Discussing fishing flies, trout flies, salmon flies, fly fishing gear and equipment, Idaho and Montana fishing rivers, NW rivers, fly tying and fly fishing trips. Over 50 years experience in fly fishing, best flies, fly tying, fly fishing techniques, fish stories, directions to rivers and lakes and great fly fishing tall tales with special communications from area guides.

Blog Usage and Invitation to Join

HOW TO USE THIS BLOG:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GUIDES GET FREE ADVERTISING - Submit stories and photos from your
guide/personal trips which will ALL be placed on our "GUIDES' / FISH
STORIES PAGE
" and "EMAIL QUESTIONS". Allow for some editing and don't forget your
contact information.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1 - The same blog header appears on each page, so please scroll down.
2 - If you like the Idaho Fly Fishers, JOIN OUR BLOG AT TOP OF RIGHT HAND
COLUMN !!!
3 - Check the box below each post and click "comments" to add your
thoughts.
4 - Go to our QUICKVIEW BLOG POST RETRIEVAL page for easy catogorized access to all of our
posts (CLICK HERE).
5 - For GREAT fly fishing photos go to Photo Headers
or Fly Fishers Photos.
6 - If you would like to have posts emailed without joining, enter your email
into the box direcely below revolving globe (right hand column). Your email
will not be shared!
7- AND PERHAPS THE MOST IMPORTANT! As we write more posts, it may be difficult
for you to find what you want. In the upper left is a blogger search box. Type
in your search desire, such as "Bull River
Montana
" and see where it takes you.




Monday, November 24, 2014

Stacked Hackle

Somehow, we have failed to discuss the "hackle". Historically, research appears to show that fly tying began around the time of the Civil War in this country - I don't know about Europe, maybe one of our readers does. The feathers and dyes have changed and new techniques have been developed.

Anyway, there are three kinds dry fly hackles of which I am aware. All warrant some discussion and are frequently a matter of personal preference. The earliest type of dry fly hackle was made from, and still is mostly today, rooster saddle feathers. The first one described was the vertical hackle. For a period of about 75 years, this method was almost exclusive. Then, apparently in the early 1930's, the parachute hackle was designed. And believe it or not, this method may have been designed by a non-fly fishing woman. The most recent method is that of a stack hackle; fairly new and I don't know the exact dates.

My personal preference is the latter. I just like the way the fly floats when the hackle is stacked. . My second favorite is the parachute hackle followed by the vertical hackle. Regardless of your personal preference, enjoy your vise and your fly tying. Even the fly tying vise is a fairly new product design. If you have a chance to look at some 100 year old flies, you will be impressed at the skill in tying and the feather dyes. Incredible! A lot of these were actually tied by hand without the use of a vise. After you try this come and fly fish Idaho soon.

Described here is the stacked hackle.

I like 2 grizzly hackles tied in.

Wrap around wings several times,
moving upwards as you go.

Now swing wings forward and secure again.

Add more dubbing if desired.

Finished stacked hackle fly.
Hard takes, bent rods and great fly tying. Come and become and Idaho fly fisher.

IdahoAngler@live.com

Tags:
  • Fishing Collectables
  • Fly Fishing Equipment:
  • Fly Fishing Lakes:
  • Fly Fishing Links
  • Fly Fishing Product Reviews      
  • Tuesday, November 18, 2014

    BWO (Blue Winged Olive) - Parachute Hackle

    Another mayfly the BWO (Blue Winged Olive) tied with a parachute hackle. This particular fly is tied on a #16 short dry hook. But you may want to tie on a #18 or smaller for those selective occasions. The other thought is a stacked hackle with bright foam wings for I personally believe these may float better.
    Olive green thread. Secure @ bend.

    Grizzly hackle for tail (length of bend). I use double hackle
    for bouyancy. Carry 2/3 way through body and secure.

    Now dub fly with olive color as shown.

    Tie in foam wings as shown.

    Wrap hackle several times and secure. Add more olive
    dubbing if desired. Trim wings to desired length.
    STOP HERE for parachute or ----->
    Foam wings trimmed w/ stacked hackle here.
    Hard takes, tight lines, bent rods on your BWO's.

    IdahoAngler@live.com
    
    Double header Browns - Big Horn, MT
    Tags:  Green River Utah     
         Hidden Gem River - Idaho
         Kootenai River Fish Story
         Lightning Creek - Idaho
         Montana Grand Slam  

    PMD (Pale Morning Dun)

    Again a mayfly - Pale Morning Dun (PMD). This one is tied on a #16 hook for illustration purposes. Smaller is perhaps better for fishing those small (and larger) Idaho fly fishing rivers especially on an early summer morning and occasionally throughout the day into the early evening.
    2 grizzly hackles with pale yellow dubbing for body,
    and thin white foam wings.

    Wrap hackle around wings in parachute fashion.

    Whip finish head.

    Apply glue if desired.

    Underside of fly. Sorry for the glare.
    Come and fly fish Idaho soon. Hard takes, tight lines, bent rods and sore arms to all of our Idaho Fly Fisher Blog followers.

    IdahoAngler@live.com

    Tags:
     
     
     
     
     

    Saturday, November 15, 2014

    Parachute Hackle

    Somehow, we have failed to discuss the "hackle". Historically, research appears to show that fly tying began around the time of the Civil War in this country - I don't know about Europe, maybe one of our readers does. The feathers and dyes have changed and new techniques have been developed.

    Anyway, there are three kinds dry fly hackles of which I am aware. All warrant some discussion and are frequently a matter of personal preference. The earliest type of dry fly hackle was made from, and still is mostly today, rooster saddle feathers. The first one described was the vertical hackle. For a period of about 75 years, this method was almost exclusive. Then, apparently in the early 1930's, the parachute hackle was designed. And believe it or not, this method may have been designed by a non-fly fishing woman. The most recent method is that of a stack hackle; fairly new and I don't know the exact dates.

    My personal preference is the latter. I just like the way the fly floats when the hackle is stacked. . My second favorite is the parachute hackle followed by the vertical hackle. Regardless of your personal preference, enjoy your vise and your fly tying. Even the fly tying vise is a fairly new product design. If you have a chance to look at some 100 year old flies, you will be impressed at the skill in tying and the feather dyes. Incredible! A lot of these were actually tied by hand without the use of a vise.

    Described here is the parachute hackle:






    Hard takes, bent rods and tight lines to all.

    IdahoAngler@live.com

    Tags:  Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear
         Grey Wulff
         Grizzly Wulff
         Hackle (Vertical)
         Hot Wings

    Thursday, November 6, 2014

    Grey Wulff

    The Grey Wulff is a derivation of the Grizzly Wulff. Both are devised from Lee Wulff's famous Royal Wulff. This latter fly does not really mimic any natural fly, but the multiple colors must be BIG trout stimulants which can make this fly so effective. Certainly the Grey and Grizzly Wulff though can be considered mayfly patterns. All 3 can be very effective Idaho Fly Fishing flies. 
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Brown Calf Tail Fur / Black Thread

    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    White Antron here for Wings

    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Grey Dumming (Thin coat)

    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Taper dubbing as shown above.
    Black hackle (barbs bend size) tied in vertically.
    3-4 wraps behind wing, 2-3 wraps in front.
    Finish head with more dubbing as shown.

    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog

    Hard takes, tight lines, huge trout. Come and fly fish Idaho soon!

    IdahoAngler@live.com

    Tags:
  • Fishing Collectables
  • Fly Fishing Equipment:
  • Fly Fishing Lakes:
  • Fly Fishing Links

  • Monday, November 3, 2014

    My Fly Fishing Life

    Ellisport Bay, ID - Late October
    Ellisport Bay, ID - Late October
    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Humpy in Kodiac, AK
    My Fly Fishing Life - Began when I was about 12 years old. Using an old parabolic 9 foot fly rod and Pflueger reel, Mr. Charlie Rambo, one of my dad's acquaintances, would take me fly fishing in the summer for bream on his little 3 acre lake in Columbus, GA. The fish were small but plentiful and small, colorful popping bugs were the ticket. We would even occasionally get a whopping 14" largemouth bass. It was great! "Mr. Charlie" was very old; like about my current age.
    
    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Nantahala Rainbow, NC
    Now, having to drive about 2 hours from my work in Washington state to my vacation home in Idaho, I have lots of time to think and take in all the changes that fall brings. Thoughts of all of the things that have brought me happiness, like my wife, my kids (when they were small), my grandkids, those huge fish both landed and that got away and our rare summertime family tent camping trips to the Great Smoky Mountains. We would even get to go tubing down a freezing "Deep Creek" near Bryson City, NC. Not having much money, I remember these things and times as some of the best in my life. And, by the way, there were no cell phones and our black and white TV only aired 3 channels and poorly at that.
    
    
    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Fernie BC, Canada Bull
    Idaho does not have a lot of deciduous trees, but the colors are still incredible. The oaks, birches and cottonwoods are all yellow and red. The tamaracks have turned golden. The gentle breezes now have a coolness signifying that winter will soon be blowing in. There is a light fog over the lake and one can barely see the boats out fishing for the lake trout and mackinaw. They must be biting, for there are dozens of boats and trailers at the ramps. You can also hear the sounds of the non-fishermen as they get their limits of ducks or a deer or an elk. 
    


    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Kenora Smallie
    I say 12, actually my fishing memories began much earlier with my brother and I fishing with worms for bream to take home to mom for dinner. I also remember the bass stealing my grandmother's cane pole as she sat snoozing next to Lake Hartwell--I was about 8. We did fish a little during elementary and high school, but most is a blur now. I was more concerned with my social life, my 1949 Dodge with its hole in the passenger side floor board through which my male friends would relieve themselves, football and of course GIRLS! Then there was college and our many trips to local lakes for whatever we could catch and the rare trip to the cold clear mountain streams of north Georgia for the brook trout and occasional rainbow. In those days, I had evolved to the fiberglass spinning rods and open faced reels and Mepps spinning lures. The fish were few, but really fun if we didn't fall in and freeze our a _ _ _s off. Couldn't afford waders.

    
    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Bow on the Big Horn
    After grad school, my fly fishing memories really began. Except for an occasional off shore trip in Virginia and North Carolina with down riggers and the rare excursion to the intercoastal waterways for yellow perch and crappie with spider rigs, I started fly fishing again on our annual trip to the White River in Arkansas. Here the rainbows, cutthroats and browns were ravenous. They would hit hair's ear nymphs and pheasant tails mostly, but I do remember the rare really good dry day. Once I started making a living with really hard work and long hours, I was fortunate enough to be able to buy some decent waders, boots, rods and reels. My fly fishing life really began.
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    White River Bow

    Kenora Canada afforded some excellent smallmouth bass, one of my favorites sports species, that would really gulp down streamers and mouse pattern floaters, The Bahamas and Florida had red fish, tarpon and bonefish--boy, talking about work. And the salmon in Alaska, well you had to work not to foul hook them. I did catch a 24" bow in Kodiac, AK only to have it stolen off my line. The streams of Colorado, Utah, Montana and Idaho though have been the BEST! Oh, and I almost forgot the Canadian rivers in British Columbia where the cutties and bulls are abundant. 
    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Grande Ronde Steelhead
    Try throwing to some of the 20+ inch browns on the Big Horn in south central Montana: or catch and release the 24" bulls on the Kootenai in northwest Montana. There are huge cuttbows which I have caught in a river in western Montana as it exits into Idaho. The St. Joe and north fork of the Coeur d'Alene have really good dry fly opportunities for large cutthroat almost all year. Oh yeah, don't forget some of the hidden gems like the Moyie, Thompson and Vermilion.
    

    Now, I work part time and spend most of my days, when not teaching the younger generation my trade, researching my next Idaho Fly Fishing trip. When the fall and winter come, after the occasional day snow skiing (knees are bad, so don't ski as much as I used to), I am searching the net for rivers, new flies and new equipment. Winter days are otherwise spent tying flies and writing articles for my blog. Don't build many rods anymore for it takes too much time. Oh and the flies I tie are generally larger than a #20, because I can't see the smaller ones anymore, even with magnification. I still really love to fish though and I still only catch and release. Believe me when I say  the thrill is still there. 
    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    N. Platte Bow
    Why fly fishing for trout? I find them much smarter than most other species for they are certainly hard to catch. Oh the feeling of catching even a small bow or cuttie on a light fly rod which you built and with a fly you tied by hand yourself. Better yet a fly of your own personal design. There is no better sport on earth. The peace and tranquility of a mountain stream, whether you catch fish or not, is beyond words.

    Come and fly fish with us in Idaho soon. You will not regret the experience. There are enough waters here to last two lifetimes.

    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Nice Coeur d'Alene Cuttie
    Hard takes, tight lines, bent rods, sore shoulders and huge, colorful trout to you all.

    PS-take pictures for your fly fishing memories. There are plenty of farm raised fish at the grocery to eat, so save the ones in the wild for future generations. Sorry for the length of this post. It is raining today and cold and I was bored.

    IdahoAngler@live.com

    
    Tags:   Kootenai River - Idaho / Montana
         Missouri River - Montana
         Moyie River - Idaho
         Moyie River - Spring 2014
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
      Big Horn Rainbow

         Nantahala River - NC
         Priest River, ID
         Snake River - ID / WA / WY
         St. Joe River - Idaho
    

    Sunday, November 2, 2014

    Grizzly Wulff

    Grizzly Wulff, Great fly, particularly during PMD hatch. Floats well with this vertical hackle or parachute hackle. I have actually started coating my dry flies with the oil coating used to waterproof canvas (outback coats and hate). Try it out yourself, but would also use some floatant such as albolene.
    
    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Calf tail here.

    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Wrap forward and add Antron wings 2/3rds way down.

    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Apply yellow dubbing as shone.

    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    I like two (2) hackle feathers. Hook curve sized barbs.

    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Wrap around hook vertically, 3-4 times behind
    and 2-3 times forward. Secure.

    Idaho Fly Fishers Blog
    Add a little more dubbing and whip finish head.
     
    IdahoAngler@live.com

    Tags:  Big Horn River - Montana
         Big Wood River - Idaho
         Bitterroot, MT - Spring - Skwala
         BUCKET LIST (THE ... of Fly Fishing)
         Bull River - Montana